Friday, February 12, 2016

The tale of the Palm Tomato

Two palm trees
Fig.1 Pam by fence
By Gary Boutin  
 

Supplies and Tools: 
Tomato cage

Michael Edwardton works for a program called Uncommon Good that teaches students about green energy. His home is located in Upland, California, a beautiful neighborhood with mature trees in a rural setting. He had just purchased a century-old home and wanted to preserve its look. Being a principal member of Uncommon Good, he was using the house to teach others how to go green.

This post shows the five steps how a disregarded Palm tree turned into a pot for local home grown tomatoes. 

Step 1: Fig.1 shows Michael back yard is full of Palm trees. Some bearing fruit and some just provide shade.
Step 2: It was the annual back yard clean up and we decided to remove dead palms and dead branches and make the back yard usable again. Fig.2 shows that some of the palms had fruit but most of the palms were used for shade. Though Michael did not eat any of the palm fruit, he believed that the local wildlife should and he kept the dates until most were eater and the branches were dead.
Palm Fruit tree not ready to eat
Fig.2 Palm 
fruit bearing
Step 3: Fig.3 shows that with the backyard being release of its dead branches we found in the corner of the lot a dead palm tree with a surprise located inside the palm base. Local tomatoes had found a home inside the base of a palm tree.
Palm Tree became a tomato container
Fig.3 
Palm Tomatoes
Step 4: Fig.4 shows the unripe tomatoes in various stages of ripeness.
This palm container for the tomatoes are ripe for eating
Fig.4 Various 
tomatoes stages
Step 5: Fig.5 and fig.6 shows that after the cleanup a tomato cage was places within the palm tree to hold up the tomato plant. Now Michael can have some of the bounty from his backyard and not give it all the local wild life.
This palm tree had green tomatoes
Fig.5 Tomato Cage
A tomato cage was added to give the tomato a chance to grow
Fig.6 Tomato cage 
and twine ties branches



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How to Keep Banana From Ripening to Fast

Ripe bananas in the kitchen
Fig.1 Bananas
By Gary Boutin

Supplies and Tools:
Clear Plastic Wrap 
Elastic Bands
Unripe Bananas Hand (bunch)

How do you keep your bananas from ripening to fast.

This post will show the three steps to a simple way to prevent the bananas.  

Step 1: Fig.1 shows a green hand (bunch) of bananas with clear plastic on the tip of the hand. 
Step 2: Fig.2 shows the use of a large rubber band holding the clear plastic wrap.

Clear plastic wrap being held by rubber band
Fig.2 Rubber band
Step 3: Fig.3 shows a close up of the rubber band and plastic wrap.
Bananas wrap with plastic wrap
Fig.3 Closeup
Step 4: Fig.4 shows ripe bananas ready to be eaten. 
Banana ready to be eaten
Fig.4 Ripe bananas
Step 5: Fig.5 and fig.6 shows a local grocery has placed tape on the tip of the Chiquita bananas bananas. If the local grocery is using this method of slowing the bananas than you know it work. For more information about banana see my post on How Do You Use a Banana Stand?
Warping Chiquita Bananas
Fig.5 Taped
Grocery bananas
Fig.6 Grocery store 
wrapped tips of bananas


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Note: The DIY Advisor assumes no liability for omissions, errors or the outcome of any jobs. The reader must always exercise reasonable caution, follow current codes and regulations that may apply, and is urged to consult with a licensed contractor if in doubt about any steps on these posts. All names were changed to protect client's privacy. DIY Advisor. Reproduction of site content including photos without permission prohibited. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011-

How Do You Use A Banana Stand

Ripe bananas need a home
Fig.1 Fresh bananas
By Gary Boutin

Supplies and Tools:
Bananas
Banana stand 

Mrs. H. lives in Hollywood, California. Today, while working on some other jobs, a banana stand stood alone.

This post shows the four steps on how to to hang bananas.

First a little history. According to The World's Healthiest Foods, the banana plant grows 10 to 26 feet and belongs to the same family as the lily and the orchid. The cluster of fruits contain any where from 50 to 150 bananas with individual fruits grouped in bunches, known as "hands," containing 10 to 25 bananas. According to Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, a single fruit is about 125 grams on average; about three quarters of this is water. Each banana (or finger) has a protective outer layer (called peel or skin). There is a fleshy part inside. Both the skin and inner part can be eaten. Western cultures generally eat the inside raw and throw away the skin while some Asian cultures generally eat both the skin and inside cooked. Now let's hang those bananas. 

Step 1: Fig.1 Above shows a nice bunch of ripe Bananas. 
Step 2: Fig.2 shows a new Banana Stand.

Banana stand with metal hook
Fig.2 The frame
Step 3: Fig.3 shows that the hook must be brought under the middle of the bananas bunch.
These banana are happy being on the hook
Fig.3 Hook

Step 4: Fig.4 shows the bananas are hooked in all its glory. Nice happy bananas ready to be eaten.
Bananas will not get bruised now that they are on the stand
Fig.4 Happy bananas


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    Note: The DIY Advisor assumes no liability for omissions, errors or the outcome of any jobs. The reader must always exercise reasonable caution, follow current codes and regulations that may apply, and is urged to consult with a licensed contractor if in doubt about any steps on these posts. All names were changed to protect client's privacy. DIY Advisor. Reproduction of site content including photos without permission prohibited. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011-

    Western Red Cedar Planks Practically Free

    Fig.1 Barbeque Joe 
    Cedar Grilling Planks
    By Gary Boutin

    Supplies and Tools:   
    Barbeque 
    Barbeque fish grill
    Barbeque Joe Cedar Grilling Planks

    My wife loves fish, we call it brain food. It's easy to digest and it taste great. So one day she noticed that her brother was using a cedar plank to cook the fish. We been looking for deals ever since. This is one of our finds. 

    This post show the six steps to using a Barbe-Que cedar wood planks. 

    Step 1: Fig.1 shows Barbeque Joe Cedar Grilling Planks which was found at a dollar store. Yes, that's .99 cents each.
    Step 2: Fig.2 shows these cedar wood planks sold in bulk. We also found them on Amazon.com for 4 planks for $19.67 including free shipping. You decided which is the better deal.

    Fig.2 Dollar Tree Sale
    Step 3: Fig.3 shows these plank are not the same quality has the ones on Amazon.com but the price sure works for my wallet. Cedar plank cooking is always done on Western Red Cedar boards.  
    Fig.3 Cedar wood planks
    Step 4: The Firepit and Grilling Guru states on their website that the cedar planks need to be soaked in water for one day. Click on Western Red Cedar boards to get great advice on great barbeque cooking.
    Step 5: allrecipes.com has (five stars) for a quick and delicious Cedar Planked Salmon written the cook named wmore. This post has been reviewed 333 times so you know your going to love it.
    Step 6: Now all you have to do is compile the ingredients and the cedar planks and cook a great meal for your family and friends. 


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    How to Open a Fresh Coconut

    Real coconut
    Fig.1 Unwashed coconut
    By Gary Boutin

    Supplies and Tools:
    Butter knife (standard blade)
    Hammer
    Metal Nail Setter
    Soap 
    Strainer-cup
    Water

    Mrs. Escarole purchased several new fresh coconuts with the outer skin removed. Shaking the coconut will give you a sense that there's plenty of coconut milk inside the shell.

    This post shows nine steps on how to open a fresh coconut.

    Coconut (Cocos nucifera) is the name given to the fruit from the coconut palm tree. Coconuts have three layers, a brown fibrous husk, inner and inside white edible “meat” and coconut water. The white meat portion is used in either fresh or dried forms. The coconut palm can grow to 30 m (98 ft) in height with large branches and can provide 50-fruit per year. According to Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, botanically the coconut fruit is a drupe. For more information about the Coconut Palm tree please click here. Coconut history was presented by wanttoknowit.com.

    Step 1: Fig.1 shows the unwashed coconut. Fig.2 shows the washing the exterior of the coconut with soap and water, rinse well with water to remove any soap film. Fig.3 shows the coconut drying on a towel. 
    In the kitchen wash the coconut before opening
    Fig.2 Washing 
    coconut
    Dry the coconut with a clean towel
    Fig.3 Drying coconut
    Step 2: Fig.4 shows a claw hammer and a metal nail set with a pointed end.
    Here use a hammer and a nail setter
    Fig.4 Hammer/nail setter
    Step 3: Fig.5 shows the nail set has punctured the hard shell were the coconut water is contained.
    Place the nail setter into the top of the coconut
    Fig.5 Nail Setter
    Step 4: Towards the top of the coconut are slightly colored holes that allow a tool to enter without losing any coconut water. Fig.6 shows the top of the coconut and one hole punctured with the nail setter and an additional hole, the breather hole to help drain the coconut water.
    Place the nail setter on the soft points of the coconut
    Fig.6 Second hole
    Step 5: Fig.7 shows three holes that will aid in removing the coconut water.
    To release the coconut water punch more than one hole
    Fig.7 Breather hole
    Step 6: Fig.8 and fig.9 shows the removal of water. Shake the coconut just a little to get the coconut water out of the shell. It takes a few shakes while one hole allows the air to get into the shell and the other two holes allow the water to escape its furry cage.
    Drain the coconut water into a bowl
    Fig.8 We're out
    Once the bowl is filled with coconut water the coconut can be broken into pieces
    Fig.9 
    Bowl is filling up
    Step 7: As the coconut is shaken some of the furry edges may fall into the coconut water. A strainer will be needed to remove any particles from the coconut water. Fig.10 shows glass bowl full of wonderful clean coconut water. Now take a small strainer and slowly pour the contents from the bowl into a cup. Once strained add some ice and drink it. It's wonderful and not full of chemicals like those carbonated drinks. Do not over drink coconut water, it's a natural cathartic.
     The coconut water should be strained before drinking
    Fig.10 
    Coconut water
    Step 8: Fig.11 and fig.12 shows the coconut is delicious white meat. A coconut with the brown and white meat. Break apart the white meat from the hard shell. This will take a little time, it seems like the white meat is firmly attached to the shell. It's delicious and can be used in cooking and cocktail drinks.
    Break the coconut in half by using the claw hammer
    Fig.11 
    Coconut cut in half
    This picture shows the coconut meat which is delicious
    Fig.12 
    Half coconut
    Step 9: Fig.13 and fig.16 shows another way is to get the coconut water is from a can. 

    You do not have to break coconuts to drink its water
    Fig.13 Canned 
    coconut water
    This picture shows the top of the coconut can
    Fig.14 top of 
    coconut water
    Here is the information on all the nutrition of this coconut water
    Fig.15 
    Nutritional facts
    Here is the UPC sticker to help you find this product
    Fig.16 
    Coconut location



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    Note: The DIY Advisor assumes no liability for omissions, errors or the outcome of any jobs. The reader must always exercise reasonable caution, follow current codes and regulations that may apply, and is urged to consult with a licensed contractor if in doubt about any steps on these posts. All names were changed to protect client's privacy. DIY Advisor. Reproduction of site content including photos without permission prohibited. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011-

    Thursday, February 11, 2016

    How Do You Smoke a Turkey

    Traeger smoke stack
    Fig.1 Stack
    By Gary Boutin
     

    Supplies and Tools: 
    Thermometer
    Traeger Lil Tex Elite Wood Pellet Grill Electric smoker  
    Turkey 12-pound  

    Over Thanksgiving my nephew Josh G. showed us his aunts, uncles and friends that a standard 12-pound turkey didn't have to bake in the oven, it could be smoked. This is a successful thanksgiving post and I never would have imagine that a smoked turkey could add so much flavor. This meal would work on any type of bird and smoking it would add a new delicious dimension to any meal.  

    This post shows the three steps to cook a smoke turkey.  

    Step 1:  Preheat smoker to 166 degrees Fahrenheit (74.4444 degree Celsius). Fig.1 above right and fig.2 below shows the smoker used during this Thanksgiving. The Traeger Lil Tex Elite Wood Pellet Grill Electric Smoker was used for this holiday meal. Listed below are some of its advantages of the Traeger Electric smoker.

    Fuel Type: Wood. Product Type: Smoker. Ignition Type: Electrical
    Assembled Depth: 20 in. Number of Shelves: 1. Wheeled: Yes. Grill Material: Steel. Color Family: Black. Cooking Space: 567 sq. in. Assembled Width: 40 in. Heat Output: 20000 BTU. Catch Pan Included: Yes. Assembled Height: 49 in. Sub Brand: Lil Tex Elite. Number of Burners: 1. Heat Thermometer:
    This is an electric smoker
    Fig.2 Electric smoker
    Step 2: Fig.3 shows that the turkey is not ready, but is starting to look good. The smoker was set first at setting one approximately 166 degrees Fahrenheit (74.44444 degree Celsius) for 1 1/2 hour. Then changed to level 5 for 6 hours at 300 degree Fahrenheit (148.88889 Degree Celsius).
    Smoker cooking turkey
    Fig.3 Not Ready 
    but almost there
    Turkey preparations:  
    1. Turkey should be always kept in the refrigerator below 40° Fahrenheit ( 4.444444 Degrees Celsius) before preparation.
    2. Prepare an 12 lb. thawed fresh turkey by removing the giblets and neck draining the juices, and clean and rinse the bird thoroughly, drying with paper towels. The turkey should be completely thawed. Remove the pop-up timer!
    3. Use hot water to help avoid wasting fuel. Place the chips pre-soaked in water for 30 minutes.
    4. Brush the skin with a combination of the seasoning and spices. Some examples are below for your considerations. Always use mitts and tongs!
    5. Set the smoker to 300° Fahrenheit (148.88889 Degree Celsius). Place the turkey on a cooking rack and cook for 6 hours. 20-30 minutes a pound to completion.
    6. Check the temperature of the turkey after 3½ hours. The turkey must pass through a critical range of 140° F (60.0000 Degree Celsius) 4 hours.
    7. Cover the turkey with aluminum foil and let stand for 20 minutes before carving. The turkey is done when the thigh meat reaches an internal temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit (73.88889 Degree Celsius) and breast for a temperature of 170° Fahrenheit (76.66667 Degree Celsius). 
    Step 3: A standard seasoning and spices were used to smoke this turkey and prevent the meat from drying out. Fig.4 shows the turkey is finished and ready to serve.
    Turkey has cooked in smoker and is ready to eat
    Fig.4 Finished
    Optional Seasonings ingredients Packet:
        1 (12 pound) whole turkey
        4 cloves garlic
        2 tablespoons seasoned salt
        1/2 cup butter
        1 apple
        1 onion
        1 tablespoon garlic powder
        1 tablespoon salt
        1 tablespoon ground black pepper


       Optional Spices ingredients:
        Salt
        Paprika
        Pepper, black
        Chili powder
        Garlic,
        Onion powder
        Cayenne pepper
        Basil
        Poultry seasoning



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    Note: The DIY Advisor assumes no liability for omissions, errors or the outcome of any jobs. The reader must always exercise reasonable caution, follow current codes and regulations that may apply, and is urged to consult with a licensed contractor if in doubt about any steps on these posts. All names were changed to protect client's privacy. DIY Advisor. Reproduction of site content including photos without permission prohibited. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011-